Many health experts recommend that each adult get a minimum of 10,000 steps every day in order to achieve a healthy lifestyle. Even if you are not up to hitting the gym for an intense workout on the weight machines, you can still get in an excellent workout simply by walking.

Walking for Seniors

Fitness is especially important for seniors, and the Walk for Your Life program gives you the chance to socialize while getting in some of your steps for the day. Providers at a Federal Way urgent care clinic offer these guidelines for improving your health and wellness through a simple daily walk.

daily walk

Choosing an Easy Trail

As you start out on your adventure with fitness walking, choose an easy trail. A Level 1 trail is mostly flat and has a paved surface. This type of a trail is ideal for seniors who have not previously lead an active lifestyle. This is also a good trail type if you have a low level of stamina or endurance.

On a Level 1 trail, you can walk at a pace of about 2 miles per hour. This trail type will help to boost your strength and fitness and is a good starting point for more vigorous activities.

Opting for a Medium Intensity Walk

Once your body is used to walking for a mile or two without stopping, you may be ready to try a medium intensity walk. A Level 2 walking trail might include a few hills or uneven surfaces that challenge your muscles. There may also be some elevation changes. These trails tend to be 2 to 3 miles long and will take about 1 to 2 hours to complete.

Gearing Up for a Challenge

As you get stronger and more fit, you may want to challenge your body on a Level 3 trail. These trails are longer and have features like tall or steep hills that make your body work harder. There could be an elevation gain of a few hundred feet on this type of a trail.

Remember to rest if you find yourself getting tired. More importantly, remember to seek immediate care from an urgent care clinic in Federal Way in the unlikely event of injuries like cuts and sprains.

Sources:
Walking. http://www.fitnessmagazine.com
Walking. http://www.webmd.com

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